Monday, September 30, 2013

Psalm 23 :Jessica

Psalm 23

A psalm of David.

The Lord is my shepherd, I lack nothing.
    He makes me lie down in green pastures,
he leads me beside quiet waters,
    he refreshes my soul.
He guides me along the right paths
    for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk
    through the darkest valley,[a]
I will fear no evil,
    for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
    they comfort me.
You prepare a table before me
    in the presence of my enemies.
You anoint my head with oil;
    my cup overflows.
Surely your goodness and love will follow me
    all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord
    forever.


ANSWER IN UOI BOOK.
DATE
POEM TITLE


1. What is this poem about? Explain what you think some of the lines mean.  (5) (3)

2. What are some of the things you notice about the punctuation?
(5) (3)

3. What devices do you notice? (rhyme, alliteration, personification, onomatopoeia?) (1) (1)



4.  Why do you think this was written? (3) (1)

WTW This Week



Today you got your new words.

By Friday you need to:



1. Write each word in a sentence in the comment section below, or use paper.

2. Write a definition for the word (its meaning)

3. Check capitals, and make sure you have a period at the end.

4 Read you sentences aloud and check/edit/revise them.

USE THIS DICTIONARY!

Jeffer and Yuki:  Choose 10 of your words to do sentences  for. Talk together to agree on the 10 words you will do please. You just need to write a sentence using each word, no definitions.

Friday, September 27, 2013

EXTRA FOR EXPERTS Poetic Devices and Vocabulary From The Highwayman

EXTRA FOR EXPERTS HOMEWORK (Only if you want to  by  FRIDAY)


THIS SITE is amazing because if you put your mouse over the words, it tells you about all the devices and vocabulary in The Highwayman.

The first half of the poem teaches you where the devices are. Can you find them in the 2nd half of the poem?

Find one example of alliteration, metaphor, simile and personification from the second half of the poem.



Alliteration - the repetition of consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of words. Alliteration is marked in blue.
Metaphor - A figure of speech which makes a comparison between two things without using the word like or as. Metaphor is marked in green.
Personification - A figure of speech in which a non-human object is given human qualities. Personification is marked in purple.
Simile - A figure of speech which makes a comparison between two things using the word like or as. Simile is marked in red
Vocabulary words - This unit provides definitions for many words that may not be familiar to you. These words are marked in yellow.

I Love the Look of Words

I Love the Look of Words
By Maya Angelou

Popcorn leaps, popping from the floor
of a hot black skillet
and into my mouth.
Black words leap,
snapping from the white
page.  Rushing into my eyes.  Sliding
into my brain which gobbles them
the way my tongue and teeth
chomp the buttered popcorn.
When I have stopped reading,
ideas from the words stay stuck
in my mind, like the sweet
smell of butter perfuming my
fingers long after the popcorn
is finished.
I love the book and the look of words
the weight of ideas that popped into my mind.
I love the tracks
of new thinking in my mind.

Homework This Weekend



The poem can be in any language.

The poem needs to be ready to show on Monday.

You need to tell us what it is about.

Also finish the Highwayman sequence.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Down The Back of The Chair

Down the back of the chair

Down the back of the chair


Our car is slow to start and go. We can’t afford a new one.
Now if you please, Dad’s lost the keys. We’re facing rack and ruin.
No car, no work! No work no pay!
We’re getting poorer day by day.
No wonder Dad is turning grey.
The morning is a blue one.
Nothing but dockets in his pockets.
Raging with despair
Dad acts appalled! Though nearly bald
He tries to tear his hair.
But Mary who is barely two
Said Dad should do what I would do
I lose a lot, but I find a few
Down the back of the chair.
He’s patted himself, and searched the shelf. He’s hunted here and there,
So now he’ll kneel and try to feel right down the back of the chair.
Oh it seemed to grin as his hand went in.
He felt a tingling in his skin.
What will a troubled father win
From down the back of the chair?
Some hairy string and a diamond ring
Were down the back of the chair,
Pineapple peel and a conger eel
Were down the back of the chair
A sip, a sup, a sop, a song. A spider seven inches long,
No wonder that it smells so strong
Down the back of the chair.
A packet of pins and one of the twins
Down the back of the chair.
A pan, a fan that belonged to Gran
Down the back of the chair …
A crumb, a comb, a clown, a cap
A pirate with a treasure map,
A dragon trying to take a nap
Down the back of the chair.
A cake, a drake, a smiling snake,
Down the back of the chair
A string of pearls, a lion with curls
Down the back of the chair
A skink, a skunk, a skate, a ski,
A couple of elephants drinking tea
The bandersnatch and the bumblebee
Down the back of the chair.
But what is this? Oh bliss! Oh bliss!
(Down the back of the chair).
The long lost will of Uncle Bill
(Down the back of the chair).
His money box all crammed with cash
Tangled up in a scarlet sash
There’s pleasure, treasure, toys and trash
Down the back of the chair.
I've found my dreams, our father beams.
(Down the back of the chair).
At last I see how life can be.
(Down the back of the chair).
Forget the keys! We're poor no more
Just call a taxi to the door.

A taxi shot out with a roar
From down the back of the chair.
ChairThe chair, the chair, the challenging chair,
The champion chair, the cheerful chair,
The charming chair, the children’s chair,
The chopped and chipped but chosen chair
To think our fortune waited there
Down the back of the chair.

Limerick For 4R



Limerick For 4R

Line 1:   There once was a class, the 4Rs,
Line 2:  At a school the greatest by far,
Line 3:  They all did their best,
Line 4:  With commitment and zest,
Line 5:  And their teacher thought they were all stars.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Limerick Work

CLICK HERE

Click: Play The Limerick Game

Read the instructions.

Click :Let's Play

Click the lines to make a Limerick.

The Sky is Crying: Personification



The sky is cryin, look at the tears roll down the street.
The sky is cryin, look at the tears roll down the street.
I'm wadin in tears lookin for my baby,
And I wonder, where can she be?

I saw my baby one mornin, and she was walkin on down the street.
I saw my baby one mornin, and she was walkin on down the street.
Made me feel so good,
Until my poor heart would skip a beat.

I got a bad feelin, my baby, my baby don't love me no more.
I got a bad feelin, my baby don't love me no more.
Now, the sky's been cryin,
The tears rollin down my nose.


Parent Poetry Questions: Due 30th Sept (Monday)

Psalm 150

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+150&version=NIV = click to hear and read


The word psalms is derived from the Greek Ψαλμοί (Psalmoi), perhaps originally meaning "music of the lyre" or "songs sung to a harp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalms


 Psalm 150
Praise the Lord.[a]
Praise God in his sanctuary;
    praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his acts of power;
    praise him for his surpassing greatness.
Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet,
    praise him with the harp and lyre,
praise him with timbrel and dancing,
    praise him with the strings and pipe,
praise him with the clash of cymbals,
    praise him with resounding cymbals.
Let everything that has breath praise the Lord.
Praise the Lord.







Q1. What do you think this Psalm means?

One paragraph at least.

Q2. If you look at the way it is written, what do you notice about the layout of the text and the punctuation?

One paragraph at least.


Q3. Choose two words that are new to you and write their definitions. 


Monday, September 23, 2013

1st Book Review Due Oct 4th



The Highwayman

POET:           Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)
                                   The Highwayman  (Scroll down for the pictures with poem).
                                        PART ONE
                                                 I
    THE wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,
    The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
    The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
    And the highwayman came riding—
                      Riding—riding—
    The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.
                                                 II
    He'd a French cocked-hat on his forehead, a bunch of lace at his chin,
    A coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of brown doe-skin;
    They fitted with never a wrinkle: his boots were up to the thigh!
    And he rode with a jewelled twinkle,
                      His pistol butts a-twinkle,
    His rapier hilt a-twinkle, under the jewelled sky.
                                                 III
    Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,
    And he tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred;
    He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
    But the landlord's black-eyed daughter,
                      Bess, the landlord's daughter,
    Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.
                                                 IV
    And dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked
    Where Tim the ostler listened; his face was white and peaked;
    His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay,
    But he loved the landlord's daughter,
                      The landlord's red-lipped daughter,
    Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say—
                                                 V
    "One kiss, my bonny sweetheart, I'm after a prize to-night,
    But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light;
    Yet, if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day,
    Then look for me by moonlight,
                      Watch for me by moonlight,
    I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way."
                                                 VI
    He rose upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand,
    But she loosened her hair i' the casement! His face burnt like a brand
    As the black cascade of perfume came tumbling over his breast;
    And he kissed its waves in the moonlight,
                      (Oh, sweet, black waves in the moonlight!)
    Then he tugged at his rein in the moonliglt, and galloped away to the West.
                                        PART TWO
                                                 I
    He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon;
    And out o' the tawny sunset, before the rise o' the moon,
    When the road was a gypsy's ribbon, looping the purple moor,
    A red-coat troop came marching—
                      Marching—marching—
    King George's men came matching, up to the old inn-door.
                                                 II
    They said no word to the landlord, they drank his ale instead,
    But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed;
    Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets at their side!
    There was death at every window;
                      And hell at one dark window;
    For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.
                                                 III
    They had tied her up to attention, with many a sniggering jest;
    They had bound a musket beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast!
    "Now, keep good watch!" and they kissed her.
                      She heard the dead man say—
    Look for me by moonlight;
                      Watch for me by moonlight;
    I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way!
                                                 IV
    She twisted her hands behind her; but all the knots held good!
    She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood!
    They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years,
    Till, now, on the stroke of midnight,
                      Cold, on the stroke of midnight,
    The tip of one finger touched it! The trigger at least was hers!
                                                 V
    The tip of one finger touched it; she strove no more for the rest!
    Up, she stood up to attention, with the barrel beneath her breast,
    She would not risk their hearing; she would not strive again;
    For the road lay bare in the moonlight;
                      Blank and bare in the moonlight;
    And the blood of her veins in the moonlight throbbed to her love's refrain .
                                                 VI
        Tlot-tlot; tlot-tlot! Had they heard it? The horse-hoofs ringing clear;
    Tlot-tlot, tlot-tlot, in the distance? Were they deaf that they did not hear?
    Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill,
    The highwayman came riding,
                      Riding, riding!
    The red-coats looked to their priming! She stood up, straight and still!
                                                 VII
    Tlot-tlot, in the frosty silence! Tlot-tlot, in the echoing night!
    Nearer he came and nearer! Her face was like a light!
    Her eyes grew wide for a moment; she drew one last deep breath,
    Then her finger moved in the moonlight,
                      Her musket shattered the moonlight,
    Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him—with her death.
                                                 VIII
    He turned; he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood
    Bowed, with her head o'er the musket, drenched with her own red blood!
    Not till the dawn he heard it, his face grew grey to hear
    How Bess, the landlord's daughter,
                      The landlord's black-eyed daughter,
    Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there.
                                                 IX
    Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky,
    With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high!
    Blood-red were his spurs i' the golden noon; wine-red was his velvet coat,
    When they shot him down on the highway,
                      Down like a dog on the highway,
    And he lay in his blood on the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.
                  *           *           *           *           *           *
                                                 X
    And still of a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,
    When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
    When the road is a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
    A highwayman comes riding—
                      Riding—riding—
    A highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.
                                                 XI
    Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard;
    He taps with his whip on the shutters, but all is locked and barred;
    He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
    But the landlord's black-eyed daughter,
                      Bess, the landlord's daughter,
    Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.







SONG

Homework : Multiplication Using Place Value: Due Friday

The student in this picture thought 6 x 27 was too difficult to do in her head.

What did she do to make it easier for herself?

Please explain in a comment.
Today you got your new words.

By Friday you need to:



1. Write each word in a sentence in the comment section below, or use paper.

2. Write a definition for the word (its meaning)

3. Check capitals, and make sure you have a period at the end.

4 Read you sentences aloud and check/edit/revise them.

USE THIS DICTIONARY!

Jeffer and Yuki:  Choose 10 of your words to do sentences  for. Talk together to agree on the 10 words you will do please. You just need to write a sentence using each word, no definitions.

Sunday, September 22, 2013



Dear 4R,

Here is a Quizlet that has figurative language meanings in it.  They are used in poetry. If you hear Mr. Ross use an example in class,  let us know!



QUIZLET : FIGURATIVE

Poetry Reading Strategies




Dear 4R,

These are things we will be practising as we read and enjoy poetry for the next unit. 

Poetry Reading Strategies

Preview the poem by reading the title and paying attention to the poem’s form: shape on the page, stanzas, number of lines and ending punctuation.
Read poem aloud several times to hear rhyme, rhythm, and the overall sound of the poem. This makes it easier to understand the poem.
Visualize the images by paying close attention to strong verbs, and comparisons in poem. Do the images remind you of anything? Let the comparisons paint a picture in your head.
Clarify words and phrases by allowing yourself to find the meaning of words or phrases that stand out, are repeated, or you do not understand the meaning. Use dictionary, context clues, teacher or peer.
Evaluate the poem’s theme by asking what message is the poet trying to send or help you understand? Does it relate to your life in any way? 

POETRY........

Knight Writer : Vishal

Knight Writer

Hello everyone my name is Vishal. I am the knight writer for this week. This week we did a lot of stuff. Our main work was to finish our summative song.

We also got to make a account in Khan academy. We started our maths group. We were put in four groups. We didn’t have Words their Way.

We just had to do our unit words. We had to write some sentences which has to do with our life and we had to write the meaning.

In maths we did a Guess the Number game and Navodit, Jude and Aarushi won and got a Push Pop as a prize. We also worked on our script for our story.

On the last day we had to perform our songs  and do the tests. We all practiced our song in the morning and sang it to our classmates. Then we sang our songs and to me everyone’s song was great. In the test we did a good job.


We were all happy and free until we went to art class. If we participated in a drawing competition we would get unbelievable prizes so everybody in our class participated in the competition.
I am bad in art still I did because I want to give a try. In the end of the day Mr.Ross read us  some books and told us  some stories with Aidan.

 We had to clean up our desks and if all of us had clean desks he said we could play a cricket match after Chuseok. We all had clean desks and got to have a cricket match.
It was a fun week and we were all happy. I love fourth grade!!!!!
                                                                                                                                                           

By: Vishal Vasan

Thursday, September 12, 2013

DUE TOMORROW: SUMMATIVE (YUKI AND JOON BE READY AFTER CHUSOK)

HOMEWORK: Practice Your Song!

For the summative you will perform a song/rap that gives detail of your beliefs/ values/ traditions / celebrations.


MAKE SURE TAKE YOUR PRINTED WORDS AND SONG FILE (MP3  ETC) TO MUSIC CLASS!!

Jude will be in charge of taking a computer with the music score app installed to music class.

I HAVE THUMB DRIVES  (USB) YOU CAN BORROW.

GOOD LUCK!  

Practice makes perfect!

Due Date: Sept 13.

Rubric: 



CLICK HERE for a music making program if you need it.

Click HERE for a rhyme dictionary




Today's Writing Prompt








This is part of a wedding ceremony.  Two people are getting married.

In your culture or country, what happens at a wedding?

What do the two people do?

What do  the wedding guests do?

What things are said?

What things are worn?

Is there any food eaten?

Is there special music?

What things are given or received?

Are any documents signed?

Use these questions to help you write at least three paragraphs about weddings from your culture. 

Jeffer and Yuki, 5 sentences please.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Today's Writing Prompt (Homework)

Look at the tallest totem pole.

There are 6 totems on it.

What do you think each one represents?  Jeffer, choose 3.

The totem poles in modern times face toward the road. In early times, which direction did they face?

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Haka

Homework : Khan Academy






https://www.khanacademy.org/

You always log in with your Google username and pass (the same as your GSIS Email)

log in and complete your Coach Recommendations by Friday/Monday.

Remember to use the Hint button and Video too.

Today's Writing Prompt

What can you see?

Why are all those people there?

Where is this?

Monday, September 9, 2013

Homework : Math

CLICK HERE and Read The Word Problem.

1. Write the answer as a comment along with the answers to questions 2 and 3.


2. What operation did you need to use? (addition, subtraction, division, multiplication)

3. What did you need to do?




Now experiment with http://www.wolframalpha.com/

Does it know everything?

Today's Writing Prompt

Each of the spokes on this wheel represent something.

What do you think each one represents? (Take a guess).

What is the wheel used for?

Jeffer and Ryan please finish.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Unit Vocabulary Review :Due Friday 13th Sept

This Week's Words are all from the unit. As we come to the end of this unit we need to be able to use the vocabulary in context. So, there is no Words Their Way this week.

1. Write the meaning of each word in your own words . (You may use a dictionary first)

2. Write a sentence using the word to explain how the word relates to YOUR LIFE.

3. Check and edit your work






 

Who We Are

Grade Level: 4th Grade

Unit 1 Who We Are


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